Sign Language Interpreter Services

  • We offer interpreter services to allow individuals who are deaf equal access to the same information provided to their hearing peers. To arrange for an interpreter, please call and ask for the Interpreter Coordinator.

    What is a Sign Language Interpreter?
    A Sign Language Interpreter is an individual who can interpret spoken English into American Sign Language, as well as interpret signed language into spoken English. The Interpreter should be qualified to meet the communication needs of both consumers.

    AIDB refers only qualified Interpreters to provide interpreting services. According to Alabama law, a qualified interpreter is one who holds either a license or permit with the State of Alabama Licensure Board for Interpreters and Transliterators. In cases where a licensed interpreter is not available, a permitted Interpreter will be assigned to provide services according to level of skill.                 

    What hours are interpreters available through AIDB?
    We offer interpreting services 24 hours a day. However, whenever possible, an interpreter should be scheduled several days in advance during normal office hours.

    What locations does the Decatur Regional Center serve?
    The following counties are served by the Decatur Regional Center:

    • Cullman
    • Lawrence
    • Limestone
    • Morgan 

    What information should be provided when scheduling an interpreter?

    • Call 256-761-3850, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
    • An interpreter should be scheduled a minimum of 48 hours in advance, excluding emergencies. The more notice you give, the better.
    • We need details such as date, time, location, expected duration of the assignment, and name of the consumer we'll be interpreting for. 
    • We will need a signed Interpreter Service Agreement, which includes invoicing information.

    What is ADA and what impact does it have on interpreting services?

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Title II, assures that people who are deaf and hard-of-hearing will have the same access as other citizens to services, programs, and activities provided by state and local governments and other public entities.